News

  • Research
  • Astrophysics/Cosmology
  • Astrophysics

One of the principal strategies to indirectly detect dark matter is to search for the photons produced when it annihilates. Such searches look for gamma rays or x rays in regions of the sky where dark matter is known to be abundant. Professors Jessie Shelton, Stuart Shapiro, and Brian Fields at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign have proposed to look inside dark matter spikes induced by the gravitational pull of supermassive black holes. Such measurements could test so called p-wave dark matter models.

  • Q&A
  • Astrophysics/Cosmology
  • Astrophysics
  • Cosmology
  • Relativity

The theory of general relativity is Einstein's theory of relativistic gravitation. It describes gravity as arising from the warping of space and time, or spacetime, caused by the presence of mass and energy. Mass curves spacetime, much like a stationary bowling ball curves a trampoline, and curved spacetime accelerates matter, much like a marble accelerates when placed on the warped trampoline.

  • Accolades
  • Astrophysics/Cosmology
  • Astrophysics
  • Cosmology

Professor Charles Gammie has been named a 2015 Simons Fellow in Theoretical Physics by the Simons Foundation.

Gammie, who has joint appointments in astronomy and physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will use the fellowship to continue his leading-edge theoretical work in black hole astrophysics, while on sabbatical next academic year at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. While abroad, Gammie will also enjoy an appointment as a visiting fellow at All Souls College in Oxford, for the fall (Michaelmas) term.

  • Research
  • Astrophysics/Cosmology
  • Astrophysics
  • Cosmology

Scientists on two continents have independently discovered a set of celestial objects that seem to belong to the rare category of dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting our home galaxy, the Milky Way.

Dwarf galaxies are the smallest known galaxies, and they could hold the key to understanding dark matter, and the process by which larger galaxies form.

A team of researchers with the Dark Energy Survey, headquartered at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and an independent group from the University of Cambridge  jointly announced their findings today. Both teams used data taken during the first year of the Dark Energy Survey, all of which is publicly available, to carry out their analysis.