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Add to Calendar 1/30/2018 3:45 pm 1/30/2018 America/Chicago Astronomy Colloquium -"Common envelope physics and the transients" DESCRIPTION:

Common-envelope events capture the imagination and are visually impressive, energetically noteworthy, and dramatically fate-defining episodes in the lives of close binary systems. During a common envelope event, two stars temporarily orbit within a shared envelope, and the episode ends with an exciting outburst, leaving behind either a significantly shrunk binary, or a single merged star. These episodes are believed to be vital for the formation of a wide range of extremely important astrophysical objects, including X-ray binaries, cataclysmic
variables, close double-neutron stars and double-black hole, and the potential progenitors of Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts.  I will review the basics of the common envelope physics, the recent progress that was made by the inclusion of recombination physics, as well as new perspectives that opened up by observations of a new class of astronomical transients, Luminous Red Novae.

\n\nSPEAKER:

Natasha Ivanova, University of Alberta

Astronomy 134

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Astronomy Colloquium -"Common envelope physics and the transients"

Speaker Natasha Ivanova, University of Alberta
Date: 1/30/2018
Time: 3:45 p.m.
Location:

Astronomy 134

Event Contact: Rebecca Bare
217-333-3090
Sponsor:

Department of Astronomy

Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

Common-envelope events capture the imagination and are visually impressive, energetically noteworthy, and dramatically fate-defining episodes in the lives of close binary systems. During a common envelope event, two stars temporarily orbit within a shared envelope, and the episode ends with an exciting outburst, leaving behind either a significantly shrunk binary, or a single merged star. These episodes are believed to be vital for the formation of a wide range of extremely important astrophysical objects, including X-ray binaries, cataclysmic
variables, close double-neutron stars and double-black hole, and the potential progenitors of Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts.  I will review the basics of the common envelope physics, the recent progress that was made by the inclusion of recombination physics, as well as new perspectives that opened up by observations of a new class of astronomical transients, Luminous Red Novae.

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.

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