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Add to Calendar 10/3/2018 4:00 pm 10/3/2018 America/Chicago Physics Colloquium: “Simple Physical Models of Complex Human Movement” DESCRIPTION:

Abstract:

The human body, with a musculoskeletal system consisting of hundreds of bones, muscles, and connective tissues, is an incredibly complex machine. So how much useful information can be gained from simplified physical models? For example, the simplest physical model of the body in an upright posture is that of an inverted pendulum, where the center of mass is located above a pivot point at the ground. In this model balance is maintained by managing the torque due to gravity via the vertical alignment of the body’s center of mass and the center of pressure at the base of support. But how far do simplified physical models go when the motion becomes increasingly complicated, for example, when the body rotates in an upright posture such as a dancer performing a pirouette?

In this talk, we will consider a theoretical model of a dancer performing pirouettes, much like a spinning top, to uncover the likelihood that dancers can perform many revolutions without making postural adjustments. I will then discuss the results of experimental studies of dancers performing pirouettes, in which high speed motion capture equipment was used to collect time series data of body segment positions and orientations during the turn and how principal components analysis (PCA) can be used to identify joint angle coordination strategies dancers use to maintain balance while rotating.

 

\n\nSPEAKER: Melanie Lott, Astronomy and Physics, Denison University
141 Loomis Lab false

Physics Colloquium: “Simple Physical Models of Complex Human Movement”

Speaker Melanie Lott, Astronomy and Physics, Denison University
Date: 10/3/2018
Time: 4 p.m.
Location: 141 Loomis Lab
Event Contact: Suzanne Hallihan
217-333-3760
shalliha@illinois.edu
Cost: None
Sponsor: Department of Physics
Event Type: Other
 

Abstract:

The human body, with a musculoskeletal system consisting of hundreds of bones, muscles, and connective tissues, is an incredibly complex machine. So how much useful information can be gained from simplified physical models? For example, the simplest physical model of the body in an upright posture is that of an inverted pendulum, where the center of mass is located above a pivot point at the ground. In this model balance is maintained by managing the torque due to gravity via the vertical alignment of the body’s center of mass and the center of pressure at the base of support. But how far do simplified physical models go when the motion becomes increasingly complicated, for example, when the body rotates in an upright posture such as a dancer performing a pirouette?

In this talk, we will consider a theoretical model of a dancer performing pirouettes, much like a spinning top, to uncover the likelihood that dancers can perform many revolutions without making postural adjustments. I will then discuss the results of experimental studies of dancers performing pirouettes, in which high speed motion capture equipment was used to collect time series data of body segment positions and orientations during the turn and how principal components analysis (PCA) can be used to identify joint angle coordination strategies dancers use to maintain balance while rotating.

 

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