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Add to Calendar 10/31/2018 4:00 pm 10/31/2018 America/Chicago Physics Colloquium: “60 years after Sputnik: a critical juncture in humanity’s use of space” DESCRIPTION:

The use of space for civil (e.g., scientific), commercial, and  military purposes has grown enormously in recent years.  Near-Earth space is extremely valuable, but it is also very vulnerable, and can easily be ruined by a small number of destructive events.  The most valuable orbits and radio bands are becoming crowded.  Placing weapons in space could threaten existing space assets and would invite the use of ground-, air- and space-based weapons against such weapons or other space assets, with potentially catastrophic consequences for humanity’s ability to use space.  Unless we manage the threats posed by crowding, orbiting debris, and deliberate destructive actions, we will lose the use of space.  A combination of informal cooperation and formal agreements seems the best approach for preserving the usefulness of space.

Fred Lamb is a Professor of Physics Emeritus at Illinois, a Core Faculty Member in the Program in Arms Control & Domestic and International Security, and an expert on space policy, military uses of space, missile defenses, and anti-satellite weapons.  His current scientific research focuses on problems in high energy and relativistic astrophysics.

 

\n\nSPEAKER:

Frederick Lamb, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

141 Loomis Laboratory

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Physics Colloquium: “60 years after Sputnik: a critical juncture in humanity’s use of space”

Speaker Frederick Lamb, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Date: 10/31/2018
Time: 4 p.m.
Location:

141 Loomis Laboratory

Event Contact: Suzanne Hallihan
217-333-3760
shalliha@illinois.edu
Sponsor:

Department of Physics

Event Type: Other
 

The use of space for civil (e.g., scientific), commercial, and  military purposes has grown enormously in recent years.  Near-Earth space is extremely valuable, but it is also very vulnerable, and can easily be ruined by a small number of destructive events.  The most valuable orbits and radio bands are becoming crowded.  Placing weapons in space could threaten existing space assets and would invite the use of ground-, air- and space-based weapons against such weapons or other space assets, with potentially catastrophic consequences for humanity’s ability to use space.  Unless we manage the threats posed by crowding, orbiting debris, and deliberate destructive actions, we will lose the use of space.  A combination of informal cooperation and formal agreements seems the best approach for preserving the usefulness of space.

Fred Lamb is a Professor of Physics Emeritus at Illinois, a Core Faculty Member in the Program in Arms Control & Domestic and International Security, and an expert on space policy, military uses of space, missile defenses, and anti-satellite weapons.  His current scientific research focuses on problems in high energy and relativistic astrophysics.

 

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.

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