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Add to Calendar 11/10/2018 10:15 am 11/10/2018 America/Chicago Ubiquitous Crackling: from Nanocrystal, to Neurons, to Earthquakes, to Stars DESCRIPTION:

Crackling noise arises when a system responds to changing conditions through discrete, sudden events spanning a broad range of sizes. A wide variety of physical systems exhibiting crackling noise have been studied, from earthquakes to paper crumpling.   The regular behavior that appears in crackling across a huge range of sizes allows us to use a trick called “universality” to describe these systems using very simple models.  I will describe these ideas using results from a model of crackling noise in plastic deformation of materials, magnets, earthquakes, the brain, and stars.

Ubiquitous Crackling

\n\nSPEAKER:

Professor Karin Dahmen, Department of Physics, University of Illinois

141 Loomis Laboratory

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Ubiquitous Crackling: from Nanocrystal, to Neurons, to Earthquakes, to Stars

Speaker Professor Karin Dahmen, Department of Physics, University of Illinois
Date: 11/10/2018
Time: 10:15 a.m.
Location:

141 Loomis Laboratory

Sponsor:

Department of Physics

Event Type: Lecture
 

Crackling noise arises when a system responds to changing conditions through discrete, sudden events spanning a broad range of sizes. A wide variety of physical systems exhibiting crackling noise have been studied, from earthquakes to paper crumpling.   The regular behavior that appears in crackling across a huge range of sizes allows us to use a trick called “universality” to describe these systems using very simple models.  I will describe these ideas using results from a model of crackling noise in plastic deformation of materials, magnets, earthquakes, the brain, and stars.

Ubiquitous Crackling

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