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Add to Calendar 12/4/2018 3:45 pm 12/4/2018 America/Chicago Astronomy Colloquium - "Gravitational Waves from Dynamically-formed Binary Black Holes" DESCRIPTION:

Since the first detection three years ago, gravitational waves have promised to revolutionize our understanding of compact objects, binary evolution, and cosmology. But to make that a reality, we need to understand how these relativistic binary systems form in the first place. In this talk, I will describe the various astrophysical pathways for creating the binary mergers detected by LIGO/Virgo, and how specific features of the gravitational waves (such as the binary eccentricities and the spins of the black holes) can illuminate the formation histories of these exotic objects. In particular, I will discuss how black holes can undergo multiple mergers in dense star clusters, creating a second generation of black holes more massive (and with potentially greater spins) than those formed through the collapse of isolated stars.

\n\nSPEAKER:

Dr. Carl Rodriguez, MIT

134 Astronomy

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Astronomy Colloquium - "Gravitational Waves from Dynamically-formed Binary Black Holes"

Speaker Dr. Carl Rodriguez, MIT
Date: 12/4/2018
Time: 3:45 p.m.
Location:

134 Astronomy

Event Contact: Rebecca Bare
217-265-8226
rsbare@illinois.edu
Sponsor:

Astronomy Department

Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

Since the first detection three years ago, gravitational waves have promised to revolutionize our understanding of compact objects, binary evolution, and cosmology. But to make that a reality, we need to understand how these relativistic binary systems form in the first place. In this talk, I will describe the various astrophysical pathways for creating the binary mergers detected by LIGO/Virgo, and how specific features of the gravitational waves (such as the binary eccentricities and the spins of the black holes) can illuminate the formation histories of these exotic objects. In particular, I will discuss how black holes can undergo multiple mergers in dense star clusters, creating a second generation of black holes more massive (and with potentially greater spins) than those formed through the collapse of isolated stars.

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.

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