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Add to Calendar 2/1/2018 11:00 am 2/2/2018 America/Chicago Special Condensed Matter Seminar:"Visualizing and manipulating electrons in topological materials." DESCRIPTION:

The nature of topological phases in solid state systems is a key outstanding research question, as it has been posited to play a critical role in enabling experimental realization of non-abelian statistics and emerging technologies such as topological quantum computation.  In this talk, I will discuss how exotic phenomena can arise from the interplay of ferromagnetism and topology in relativistic materials and how these novel phases can be harnessed to build the next generation of quantum devices.  I will lay out a suite of complementary tools – electronic transport, nanofabrication, and microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) – that shed light on topological electronic states across the phase diagram in two systems: bilayer graphene and magnetic topological insulators.  Finally, I will outline how MIM could be used in the future to image and manipulate Majorana modes, an emerging platform for quantum information processing.

\n\nSPEAKER:

Monica Allen, Stanford University

190 ESB

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Special Condensed Matter Seminar:"Visualizing and manipulating electrons in topological materials."

Speaker Monica Allen, Stanford University
Date: 2/1/2018 - 2/2/2018
Time: 11 a.m.
Location:

190 ESB

Event Contact: Marjorie Gamel
217-333-3762
mgamel@illinois.edu
Sponsor:

Department of Physics

Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

The nature of topological phases in solid state systems is a key outstanding research question, as it has been posited to play a critical role in enabling experimental realization of non-abelian statistics and emerging technologies such as topological quantum computation.  In this talk, I will discuss how exotic phenomena can arise from the interplay of ferromagnetism and topology in relativistic materials and how these novel phases can be harnessed to build the next generation of quantum devices.  I will lay out a suite of complementary tools – electronic transport, nanofabrication, and microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) – that shed light on topological electronic states across the phase diagram in two systems: bilayer graphene and magnetic topological insulators.  Finally, I will outline how MIM could be used in the future to image and manipulate Majorana modes, an emerging platform for quantum information processing.

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.

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