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Add to Calendar 2/15/2019 12:00 pm 2/15/2019 America/Chicago Special Theoretical Gravitational Seminar: "Probing Physics with Extreme Gravity Observations" DESCRIPTION:

 Black holes, neutron stars and gravitational waves will soon (or have already!) been observed in exquisite detail by new telescopes and interferometers, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, the International Pulsar Timing Array, the Event Horizon Telescope and the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR. These observations are revealing a plethora of information about gravity and about astrophysics in a previously inaccessible, extreme regime: where the gravitational force is immense relative to that in the Solar System, and where characteristic velocities are close to the speed of light. In this talk, I will give an overview of a subset of my research program in extreme gravitational astrophysics. In particular, I will discuss two recent sets of results: one concerning approximately universal relations in neutron stars and their use to extract physics from gravitational wave signals, and another concerning the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework and its use to test General Relativity with gravitational waves.  

\n\nSPEAKER:

Professor Nicolas Yunes, Montana State University

464 Loomis

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Special Theoretical Gravitational Seminar: "Probing Physics with Extreme Gravity Observations"

Speaker Professor Nicolas Yunes, Montana State University
Date: 2/15/2019
Time: 12 p.m.
Location:

464 Loomis

Event Contact: Marjorie Gamel
217-333-3762
mgamel@illinois.edu
Sponsor:

Department of Physics

Event Type: Other
 

 Black holes, neutron stars and gravitational waves will soon (or have already!) been observed in exquisite detail by new telescopes and interferometers, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, the International Pulsar Timing Array, the Event Horizon Telescope and the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR. These observations are revealing a plethora of information about gravity and about astrophysics in a previously inaccessible, extreme regime: where the gravitational force is immense relative to that in the Solar System, and where characteristic velocities are close to the speed of light. In this talk, I will give an overview of a subset of my research program in extreme gravitational astrophysics. In particular, I will discuss two recent sets of results: one concerning approximately universal relations in neutron stars and their use to extract physics from gravitational wave signals, and another concerning the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework and its use to test General Relativity with gravitational waves.  

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.

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