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Add to Calendar 2/21/2018 4:00 pm 2/21/2018 America/Chicago Physics Colloquium: "The Principle of Least Action: History and Physics" DESCRIPTION:

The principle of least action originates in the idea that, if nature has a purpose, it should follow a minimum or critical path. This simple principle, and its variants and generalizations, applies to optics, mechanics, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics, and provides an essential guide to understanding the beauty of physics. My talk will be a tour of the history of the principle based on the book with the same title that I wrote in collaboration with Anthony Bloch, and soon to be published by Cambridge University Press. The book examines the principle and its fundamental role in science. including - with varying levels of mathematical sophistication - explanations from historical sources, discussion of classic papers, and original worked examples. The result is a story that is understandable to those with a modest mathematical background, as well as to researchers and students in physics and the history of physics

\n\nSPEAKER:

Alberto Rojo, Oakland University

141 Loomis

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Physics Colloquium: "The Principle of Least Action: History and Physics"

Speaker Alberto Rojo, Oakland University
Date: 2/21/2018
Time: 4 p.m.
Location:

141 Loomis

Event Contact: Stephanie Johansson
217-300-4241
sjohanss@illinois.edu
Sponsor:

Department of Physics

Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

The principle of least action originates in the idea that, if nature has a purpose, it should follow a minimum or critical path. This simple principle, and its variants and generalizations, applies to optics, mechanics, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics, and provides an essential guide to understanding the beauty of physics. My talk will be a tour of the history of the principle based on the book with the same title that I wrote in collaboration with Anthony Bloch, and soon to be published by Cambridge University Press. The book examines the principle and its fundamental role in science. including - with varying levels of mathematical sophistication - explanations from historical sources, discussion of classic papers, and original worked examples. The result is a story that is understandable to those with a modest mathematical background, as well as to researchers and students in physics and the history of physics

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.

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