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Add to Calendar 3/12/2018 1:00 pm 3/12/2018 America/Chicago High Energy/Medium Energy Physics Seminar: "Dark Matter in the Gaia Era" DESCRIPTION:

Gravitational probes of dark matter may provide the first hints of beyond-the-standard-model physics in the dark sector. For example, if a component of the dark matter has dissipative interactions, it could collapse to form a thin dark disk in our Galaxy coincident with the baryonic disk. It has been suggested that dark disks could explain a variety of observed phenomena. Using the first data release from the Gaia space observatory, I will present the results of a search for a dark disk via its effect on stellar kinematics in the Milky Way. I will discuss how our new limits disfavor the presence of a thin dark disk. I will then present a new method for using stellar kinematic data to search for low-mass substructure in the Milky Way’s dark matter halo, at masses ~10^7 solar masses or below. Applications of this method to future datasets from observatories such as Gaia and LSST could shed light on a variety of dark matter models, including warm dark matter, fuzzy dark matter, and self-interacting dark matter.

\n\nSPEAKER:

Ben Safdi (University of Michigan)

464 Loomis

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High Energy/Medium Energy Physics Seminar: "Dark Matter in the Gaia Era"

Speaker Ben Safdi (University of Michigan)
Date: 3/12/2018
Time: 1 p.m. -

2:00 pm

Location:

464 Loomis

Event Contact: Lauren Pearce
lpearce@illinois.edu
Sponsor:

Department of Physics

Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

Gravitational probes of dark matter may provide the first hints of beyond-the-standard-model physics in the dark sector. For example, if a component of the dark matter has dissipative interactions, it could collapse to form a thin dark disk in our Galaxy coincident with the baryonic disk. It has been suggested that dark disks could explain a variety of observed phenomena. Using the first data release from the Gaia space observatory, I will present the results of a search for a dark disk via its effect on stellar kinematics in the Milky Way. I will discuss how our new limits disfavor the presence of a thin dark disk. I will then present a new method for using stellar kinematic data to search for low-mass substructure in the Milky Way’s dark matter halo, at masses ~10^7 solar masses or below. Applications of this method to future datasets from observatories such as Gaia and LSST could shed light on a variety of dark matter models, including warm dark matter, fuzzy dark matter, and self-interacting dark matter.

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