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Add to Calendar 3/6/2018 3:45 pm 3/6/2018 America/Chicago Astronomy Colloquium - "Mapping the Nearest Stars for Habitable Worlds" DESCRIPTION:

Thousands of exoplanets are known to orbit nearby stars, and small rocky planets are established to be common. The ambitious goal of identifying a habitable or inhabited world is within reach. The race to find habitable exoplanets has accelerated with the realization that “big Earths” transiting small stars can be both discovered and characterized with current technology, such that the James Webb Space Telescope has a chance to be the first to provide evidence of biosignature gases. Transiting exoplanets require a fortuitous alignment and the fast-track approach is therefore only the first step in a long journey.

What will it take to identify such habitable worlds with the observations, and theoretical tools available to us?

 

Sara Seager is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she is a Professor of Planetary Science, Professor of Physics, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, and holds the Class of 1941 Professor Chair. Professor Seager works on space missions for exoplanets, was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2015, is a 2013 MacArthur Fellow, is a recipient of the 2012 Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences, and has Asteroid 9729 named in her honor.

\n\nSPEAKER:

Prof. Sara Seager, MIT

NCSA Auditorium

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Astronomy Colloquium - "Mapping the Nearest Stars for Habitable Worlds"

Speaker Prof. Sara Seager, MIT
Date: 3/6/2018
Time: 3:45 p.m.
Location:

NCSA Auditorium

Event Contact: Rebecca Bare
217-333-3090
Sponsor:

Department of Astronomy

Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

Thousands of exoplanets are known to orbit nearby stars, and small rocky planets are established to be common. The ambitious goal of identifying a habitable or inhabited world is within reach. The race to find habitable exoplanets has accelerated with the realization that “big Earths” transiting small stars can be both discovered and characterized with current technology, such that the James Webb Space Telescope has a chance to be the first to provide evidence of biosignature gases. Transiting exoplanets require a fortuitous alignment and the fast-track approach is therefore only the first step in a long journey.

What will it take to identify such habitable worlds with the observations, and theoretical tools available to us?

 

Sara Seager is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she is a Professor of Planetary Science, Professor of Physics, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, and holds the Class of 1941 Professor Chair. Professor Seager works on space missions for exoplanets, was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2015, is a 2013 MacArthur Fellow, is a recipient of the 2012 Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences, and has Asteroid 9729 named in her honor.

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