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Add to Calendar 4/9/2019 3:45 pm 4/9/2019 America/Chicago Astronomy Colloquium - "Supermassive Black Hole Outflows and Pairs" DESCRIPTION:

Supermassive black holes, once thought to be theoretical novelties, are now considered to play a major role in many astrophysical phenomena including galaxy evolution. Now that we live in the era of gravitational wave observations, it is interesting to look forward to a time when we can detect gravitational waves from supermassive black hole coalescence. A major question remains: Do supermassive black holes merge? I will review the case for supermassive black holes as active players in the universe, focusing on the black hole outflows. Then I will focus on my recent work searching for dual and binary AGNs along with recent developments: (1) closer inspection of time-domain-identified binary candidates; (2) a Bayesian framework for determining duality in a Chandra observation; and (3) spectroscopic and time-domain identification of low-mass-ratio binary AGN.

\n\nSPEAKER: Dr. Kayhan Gültekin, University of Michigan
134 Astronomy false

Astronomy Colloquium - "Supermassive Black Hole Outflows and Pairs"

Speaker Dr. Kayhan Gültekin, University of Michigan
Date: 4/9/2019
Time: 3:45 p.m.
Location: 134 Astronomy
Event Contact: Rebecca Bare
217-265-8226
rsbare@illinois.edu
Sponsor: Astronomy Department
Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

Supermassive black holes, once thought to be theoretical novelties, are now considered to play a major role in many astrophysical phenomena including galaxy evolution. Now that we live in the era of gravitational wave observations, it is interesting to look forward to a time when we can detect gravitational waves from supermassive black hole coalescence. A major question remains: Do supermassive black holes merge? I will review the case for supermassive black holes as active players in the universe, focusing on the black hole outflows. Then I will focus on my recent work searching for dual and binary AGNs along with recent developments: (1) closer inspection of time-domain-identified binary candidates; (2) a Bayesian framework for determining duality in a Chandra observation; and (3) spectroscopic and time-domain identification of low-mass-ratio binary AGN.

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