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Add to Calendar 5/22/2018 1:00 pm 5/22/2018 America/Chicago Special High Energy/Medium Energy Physics Seminar: "Precision Numerical Simulations of Nature's Most Extreme Fluid " DESCRIPTION:

The strongest fundamental force of nature generates ~96% of the mass of the visible universe and binds together the building blocks of Quantum Chromodynamics, quarks and gluons, within the proton. At temperatures of a few trillion Kelvin these quarks are gluons strongly interact in an exotic state of matter known at the Quark Gluon Plasma that behaves as a nearly perfect liquid. Collider experiments have been smashing heavy-ions together at nearly the speed of light in order to produce tiny droplets of the Quark Gluon Plasma in the laboratory with a size of the order of trillionth cm. 

In this talk I will discuss the "standard model" of the Quark Gluon Plasma that has emerged with the development of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. With the help of high performance numerical simulations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics requiring Big Data techniques for statistical analysis, I will show that is now possible to make precise connections to nuclear structure, constrain the equation of state of the quark epoch of the early universe, and overhaul preconceptions on the spatial shape of a proton. Future goals of mapping out the Quantum Chromodynamic phase diagram and precision studies of jets will also be discussed. 

\n\nSPEAKER:

Professor Jacquelyn Noronha-Hostler, Rutgers University

464 Loomis

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Special High Energy/Medium Energy Physics Seminar: "Precision Numerical Simulations of Nature's Most Extreme Fluid "

Speaker Professor Jacquelyn Noronha-Hostler, Rutgers University
Date: 5/22/2018
Time: 1 p.m.
Location:

464 Loomis

Event Contact: Marjorie Gamel
217-333-3762
mgamel@illinois.edu
Sponsor:

Physics Department

Event Type: Other
 

The strongest fundamental force of nature generates ~96% of the mass of the visible universe and binds together the building blocks of Quantum Chromodynamics, quarks and gluons, within the proton. At temperatures of a few trillion Kelvin these quarks are gluons strongly interact in an exotic state of matter known at the Quark Gluon Plasma that behaves as a nearly perfect liquid. Collider experiments have been smashing heavy-ions together at nearly the speed of light in order to produce tiny droplets of the Quark Gluon Plasma in the laboratory with a size of the order of trillionth cm. 

In this talk I will discuss the "standard model" of the Quark Gluon Plasma that has emerged with the development of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. With the help of high performance numerical simulations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics requiring Big Data techniques for statistical analysis, I will show that is now possible to make precise connections to nuclear structure, constrain the equation of state of the quark epoch of the early universe, and overhaul preconceptions on the spatial shape of a proton. Future goals of mapping out the Quantum Chromodynamic phase diagram and precision studies of jets will also be discussed. 

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.

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