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Add to Calendar 8/27/2018 1:00 pm 8/27/2018 America/Chicago Medium and High Energy Physics Seminar: "Evidence for a source of high energy astrophysical neutrinos" DESCRIPTION:

High-energy astrophysical neutrinos were discovered in 2013 by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.  However, their origins have remained mysterious, with many leading source classes disfavored by multi-messenger analyses.  On September 22, 2017, IceCube detected an individual high-energy neutrino.  Within one minute, the observatory automatically issued a public alert with the neutrino’s measured direction, and many telescopes pointed in that direction.  Gamma-ray telescopes including Fermi and MAGIC detected a flaring blazar (a type of active galactic nucleus), named TXS 0506+056, in the same direction.  An IceCube analysis of archival data then identified an excess of neutrinos detected between 2014 and 2015 from the same direction.  I will summarize the evidence for TXS 0506+056 as the first identified source of high energy astrophysical neutrinos.  Despite this detection, there are at least ~100 additional sources, and likely multiple additional source classes, not yet detected.

 

\n\nSPEAKER:

Justin Vandenbroucke, University of Wisconsin

464 Loomis

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Medium and High Energy Physics Seminar: "Evidence for a source of high energy astrophysical neutrinos"

Speaker Justin Vandenbroucke, University of Wisconsin
Date: 8/27/2018
Time: 1 p.m.
Location:

464 Loomis

Sponsor:

Physics Department

Event Type: Seminar/Symposium
 

High-energy astrophysical neutrinos were discovered in 2013 by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.  However, their origins have remained mysterious, with many leading source classes disfavored by multi-messenger analyses.  On September 22, 2017, IceCube detected an individual high-energy neutrino.  Within one minute, the observatory automatically issued a public alert with the neutrino’s measured direction, and many telescopes pointed in that direction.  Gamma-ray telescopes including Fermi and MAGIC detected a flaring blazar (a type of active galactic nucleus), named TXS 0506+056, in the same direction.  An IceCube analysis of archival data then identified an excess of neutrinos detected between 2014 and 2015 from the same direction.  I will summarize the evidence for TXS 0506+056 as the first identified source of high energy astrophysical neutrinos.  Despite this detection, there are at least ~100 additional sources, and likely multiple additional source classes, not yet detected.

 

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