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Add to Calendar 9/19/2018 4:00 pm 9/19/2018 America/Chicago Physics Colloquium: "Universality of Complex Electronic Pattern Formation in Correlated Oxides" DESCRIPTION:

Inside conventional materials like metals and semiconductors, the electrons are evenly spread out, like liquid filling a container. But the electrons inside of strongly correlated materials act more like an exotic gumbo: nanoscale images show that the electrons are inhomogeneous, clumping into complicated shapes such as fractals at the surface of many of these materials. Understanding the formation of these patterns is vital to our understanding of the electronic properties and to our eventual technological control of these materials.

Rapidly expanding experimental capabilities have led to a growing wealth of data on multiple length scales, revealing rich electronic textures at the nanoscale and mesoscale in many correlated oxides. We have developed a new conceptual framework for interpreting the wealth of spatial information contained in the geometric properties of these textures. By importing geometric cluster analysis techniques from disordered statistical mechanics, we identify universal scaling properties of the spatial complexity in strongly correlated materials like cuprate superconductors, vanadium dioxide, and nickelates.

Because of the long equilibration times associated with these patterns, we expect glassiness and hysteresis effects to be prominent in strongly correlated systems with competing phases.

\n\nSPEAKER: Erica Carlson, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University
141 Loomis Lab false

Physics Colloquium: "Universality of Complex Electronic Pattern Formation in Correlated Oxides"

Speaker Erica Carlson, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University
Date: 9/19/2018
Time: 4 p.m.
Location: 141 Loomis Lab
Event Contact: Marjorie Gamel
217-333-3762
mgamel@illinois.edu
Cost: None
Sponsor: Department of Physics
Event Type: Other
 

Inside conventional materials like metals and semiconductors, the electrons are evenly spread out, like liquid filling a container. But the electrons inside of strongly correlated materials act more like an exotic gumbo: nanoscale images show that the electrons are inhomogeneous, clumping into complicated shapes such as fractals at the surface of many of these materials. Understanding the formation of these patterns is vital to our understanding of the electronic properties and to our eventual technological control of these materials.

Rapidly expanding experimental capabilities have led to a growing wealth of data on multiple length scales, revealing rich electronic textures at the nanoscale and mesoscale in many correlated oxides. We have developed a new conceptual framework for interpreting the wealth of spatial information contained in the geometric properties of these textures. By importing geometric cluster analysis techniques from disordered statistical mechanics, we identify universal scaling properties of the spatial complexity in strongly correlated materials like cuprate superconductors, vanadium dioxide, and nickelates.

Because of the long equilibration times associated with these patterns, we expect glassiness and hysteresis effects to be prominent in strongly correlated systems with competing phases.

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