Celia Elliott selected for Excellence in Teaching Undergraduate Physics award

Siv Schwink
4/24/2013

Celia Elliott, Director of External Affairs and Special Projects and teacher of several courses at Physics Illinois, has been selected as the second recipient of the Doug and Judy Davis Award for Excellence in Teaching Undergraduate Physics.

Department Head and Professor Dale Van Harlingen said Elliott has been an asset to teaching faculty and students alike.

"No one in our department is more deserving of this award than Celia for her many years of commitment to our educational mission, helping faculty, staff, and students at all levels," said Van Harlingen. "We particularly want to recognize the extraordinary contributions she has made and continues to make to develop our senior thesis course sequence into one of the most popular and effective programs in our curriculum."

Known also among her colleagues for her exacting standards in everything to do with the written word, Elliott has exceptional skills in grant writing, on which subject she has authored two books in Russian and is a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Elliott is recipient of the Public Affairs ACME "Team Player" Award, 2010, the Civilian Research and Development Foundation Recognition Medal, 2005, the Physics Haiku Grand Champion, American Physical Society, 2004, and the Chancellor's Academic Professional Award, 2002.

Elliott will be recognized for her teaching today at a special Physics colloquium, at 4 p.m. in 141 Loomis Laboratory. She will also receive a plaque to display in recognition of this award.

This award was created and funded by Doug and Judy Davis to recognize faculty or staff members who truly enhance undergraduate education in the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois.




 

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