Celia Elliott selected for Excellence in Teaching Undergraduate Physics award

Siv Schwink
4/24/2013

Celia Elliott, Director of External Affairs and Special Projects and teacher of several courses at Physics Illinois, has been selected as the second recipient of the Doug and Judy Davis Award for Excellence in Teaching Undergraduate Physics.

Department Head and Professor Dale Van Harlingen said Elliott has been an asset to teaching faculty and students alike.

"No one in our department is more deserving of this award than Celia for her many years of commitment to our educational mission, helping faculty, staff, and students at all levels," said Van Harlingen. "We particularly want to recognize the extraordinary contributions she has made and continues to make to develop our senior thesis course sequence into one of the most popular and effective programs in our curriculum."

Known also among her colleagues for her exacting standards in everything to do with the written word, Elliott has exceptional skills in grant writing, on which subject she has authored two books in Russian and is a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Elliott is recipient of the Public Affairs ACME "Team Player" Award, 2010, the Civilian Research and Development Foundation Recognition Medal, 2005, the Physics Haiku Grand Champion, American Physical Society, 2004, and the Chancellor's Academic Professional Award, 2002.

Elliott will be recognized for her teaching today at a special Physics colloquium, at 4 p.m. in 141 Loomis Laboratory. She will also receive a plaque to display in recognition of this award.

This award was created and funded by Doug and Judy Davis to recognize faculty or staff members who truly enhance undergraduate education in the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois.




 

Recent News

  • In the Media

Paul Kwiat asks his volunteers to sit inside a small, dark room. As their eyes adjust to the lack of light, each volunteer props his or her head on a chin rest—as you would at an optometrist’s—and gazes with one eye at a dim red cross. On either side of the cross is an optical fiber, positioned to pipe a single photon of light at either the left or the right side of a volunteer’s eye.

Even as he verifies the human eye’s ability to detect single photons, Kwiat, an experimental quantum physicist at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, and his colleagues are setting their sights higher: to use human vision to probe the very foundations of quantum mechanics, according to a paper they submitted to the preprint server arXiv on June 21.

  • Research
  • Biological Physics

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have predicted new physics governing compression of water under a high-gradient electric field. Physics Professor Aleksei Aksimentiev and his post doctoral researcher James Wilson found that a high electric field applied to a tiny hole in a graphene membrane would compress the water molecules travelling through the pore by 3 percent. The predicted water compression may eventually prove useful in high-precision filtering of biomolecules for biomedical research.

  • Research
  • Biological Physics
  • Biophysics

A new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells.   

Researchers at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Cambridge say their lipid-scrambling DNA enzyme is the first in its class to outperform naturally occurring enzymes – and does so by three orders of magnitude. They published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

  • Accolades
  • High Energy Physics

Assistant Professor of Physics Thomas Faulkner has been selected by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science to receive an Early Career Award. The DOE Early Career Research Program, now in its ninth year, provides award recipients with significant funding over a five year period. Faulkner is among 84 scientists at U.S. universities and DOE-supported national laboratories to be selected this year. He is one of only two scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to receive the honor this year.

The Early Career Award recognizes promising scientists within 10 years of having earned their doctoral degrees, working in research areas supported by the DOE Office of Science. Faulkner’s research proposal in theoretical high-energy physics is entitled, “New perspectives on QFT and gravity from quantum entanglement.”