Illinois Physics graduate student Logan Meredith receives Department of Energy fellowship

Thomas R. O'Donnell for DOE NNSA LRGF
9/2/2020

Illinois Physics graduate student Logan Meredith
Illinois Physics graduate student Logan Meredith
Logan Meredith, a doctoral candidate in Davide Curreli’s research group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is one of five graduate students chosen for a fellowship that places them at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for extended periods.

The DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratory Residency Graduate Fellowship (DOE NNSA LRGF) focuses on Ph.D. candidates working in selected areas important to national security. Fellows will serve at least two 12-week residencies at one or more of four DOE sites. The program encourages students to pursue their thesis research during their stays and to take on additional extended residencies.

Meredith, from Longmont, Colorado, will serve his first residency at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, researching issues in physics with Richard Kramer.

Besides introducing fellows to the DOE system, the program promotes interactive relationships that connect them and their faculty advisors with laboratory scientists. These collaborations will give students and professors access to unique and powerful experimental resources and are expected to lead to employment opportunities and advancement within the labs.

Other benefits include a yearly stipend, full payment of tuition and fees during the appointment period, an annual academic allowance, participation in a yearly program review and more. The DOE NNSA LRGF is renewable for up to four years.

Established by Congress in 2000, the NNSA is a semi-autonomous DOE agency that is responsible for enhancing national security through the military application of nuclear science. The NNSA maintains and enhances the safety, security and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing; works to reduce the global danger from weapons of mass destruction; provides the U.S. Navy with safe and effective nuclear propulsion; and responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the U.S. and abroad.

The Krell Institute of Ames, Iowa manages the fellowship under a contract with the DOE NNSA. For more information, visit http://www.krellinst.org/lrgf.

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