Annual Physical Revue


11/13/2009

The Physical Revue is the department's annual talent show. This year it will be held on Dec 9. In the past we have had musicians, dancers, actors, and even speed rubik's cube solvers.

If you have an act you would like to contribute, please contact Hannah DeBerg (hdeberg2@illinois.edu) or Yun Liu (yunliu1@illinois.edu).

To see last year's faculty contribution, visit http://research.physics.illinois.edu/QI/Photonics/fun/.

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