Saturday Physics for Everyone

Add to Calendar 10/26/2019 10:15 am 10/26/2019 America/Chicago Saturday Physics for Everyone DESCRIPTION:

More than eighty years after the muon was first discovered, it remains a source of mystery. Fortunately, experiments are underway that use muons as a window to search for new physics — a central goal of the high energy physics community.  These efforts build on the tantalizing tension between physics experimentalists and theorists, each trying to determine the muon’s magnetic moment.  The theory predicts about three-and-a-half standard deviations difference to the currently observed data, and this disagreement hints towards new, previously misunderstood physics. In particular, the recently started experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon’s magnetic moment with exquisite precision of 140 parts per billion, which would reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of four.  After a brief tour of its history, I will discuss the ongoing interplay between theory and experiment that is essential for revealing one of the remaining unknowns of the universe.

The Mysterious Muon

\n\nSPEAKER:

Prof. Aida El-Khadra

141 Loomis Laboratory

false
Title The Mysterious Muon
Speaker Prof. Aida El-Khadra
Date: 10/26/2019
Time: 10:15 a.m.
Location:

141 Loomis Laboratory

Sponsor:

Physics Department

Contact: Patrick J Snyder
psnyder@illinois.edu
Originating Calendar: Physics - Saturday Physics for Everyone
Abstract:

More than eighty years after the muon was first discovered, it remains a source of mystery. Fortunately, experiments are underway that use muons as a window to search for new physics — a central goal of the high energy physics community.  These efforts build on the tantalizing tension between physics experimentalists and theorists, each trying to determine the muon’s magnetic moment.  The theory predicts about three-and-a-half standard deviations difference to the currently observed data, and this disagreement hints towards new, previously misunderstood physics. In particular, the recently started experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon’s magnetic moment with exquisite precision of 140 parts per billion, which would reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of four.  After a brief tour of its history, I will discuss the ongoing interplay between theory and experiment that is essential for revealing one of the remaining unknowns of the universe.

The Mysterious Muon

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.