Saturday Physics for Everyone

Add to Calendar 11/14/2020 10:15 am 11/14/2020 America/Chicago Saturday Physics for Everyone DESCRIPTION:

Theoretical Physicist Prof. Jaki Noronha-Hostler presents a Saturday Physics for Everyone (SPE) talked entitled "Reverse alchemy: turning gold into the most perfect liquid" on Nov. 14, from 10:15-11:30. Also, don’t miss the panel discussion for high school students interested in majoring in physics, held at noon CT, using the same link. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Abstract:
We are all familiar with liquids such as water and intuitively know many of its basic properties.  But what happens when a liquid is moving at 99.9999% the speed of light? What happens when we heat it up to the hottest temperatures ever reached on Earth?  What happens when the liquid forms the smallest droplet known to humanity?  To answer these questions, physicists have been performing reverse alchemy.   Instead of turning lead into gold, scientists have been working for the past 20 years to turn gold ions into the smallest, hottest, and fastest flowing droplets of liquid created on Earth- the Quark-Gluon Plasma. In this talk, I will explain how we can study such an extreme liquid and explain why it can provide insight into the Early Universe and potentially what lies inside a neutron star's core. 

A Q&A discussion panel for high school students interested in majoring in physics will be held directly after Prof. Noronha-Hostler's lecture, from 12:00-12:45 CT. This panel will include current and former Illinois Physics undergraduate students answering prospective student questions including:

  • How do you best prepare for an undergraduate physics degree in high school?
  • What types of things will you learn as an undergraduate Illinois Physics student?
  • Common questions regarding on-campus life, housing, and food
  • Where do our graduates end up? What types of positions do they take?
  • Much more, including any questions you bring!
\n\nSPEAKER: Professor Jaki Noronha-Hostler
Zoom Webinar false
Title Reverse alchemy: turning gold into the most perfect liquid
Speaker Professor Jaki Noronha-Hostler
Date: 11/14/2020
Time: 10:15 a.m.
Location: Zoom Webinar
Sponsor: Department of Physics
Contact: Patrick Snyder
217-300-9957
psnyder@illinois.edu
Originating Calendar: Physics - Saturday Physics for Everyone
Abstract:

Theoretical Physicist Prof. Jaki Noronha-Hostler presents a Saturday Physics for Everyone (SPE) talked entitled "Reverse alchemy: turning gold into the most perfect liquid" on Nov. 14, from 10:15-11:30. Also, don’t miss the panel discussion for high school students interested in majoring in physics, held at noon CT, using the same link. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Abstract:
We are all familiar with liquids such as water and intuitively know many of its basic properties.  But what happens when a liquid is moving at 99.9999% the speed of light? What happens when we heat it up to the hottest temperatures ever reached on Earth?  What happens when the liquid forms the smallest droplet known to humanity?  To answer these questions, physicists have been performing reverse alchemy.   Instead of turning lead into gold, scientists have been working for the past 20 years to turn gold ions into the smallest, hottest, and fastest flowing droplets of liquid created on Earth- the Quark-Gluon Plasma. In this talk, I will explain how we can study such an extreme liquid and explain why it can provide insight into the Early Universe and potentially what lies inside a neutron star's core. 

A Q&A discussion panel for high school students interested in majoring in physics will be held directly after Prof. Noronha-Hostler's lecture, from 12:00-12:45 CT. This panel will include current and former Illinois Physics undergraduate students answering prospective student questions including:

  • How do you best prepare for an undergraduate physics degree in high school?
  • What types of things will you learn as an undergraduate Illinois Physics student?
  • Common questions regarding on-campus life, housing, and food
  • Where do our graduates end up? What types of positions do they take?
  • Much more, including any questions you bring!

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact the person listed above, or the unit hosting the event.