Timothy Stelzer receives Rose Award for Excellence in Teaching

Siv Schwink
4/27/2015

Associate Professor of Physics Timothy Stelzer
Associate Professor of Physics Timothy Stelzer
Timothy Stelzer has received the 2015 Rose Award for Excellence in Teaching from the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. The award was presented at a College of Engineering faculty awards ceremony on Monday, April 27, 2015.

Stelzer, a high-energy particle theorist who has developed software now in use by particle physicists around the globe, and is a founding member of the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Illinois. Stelzer is a strong proponent of the importance of evidence-based teaching methodologies and the effective use of technology in student learning..

Head of Department and Professor Dale Van Harlingen comments, “There is indeed not an award at any level that includes the words 'teaching excellence' for which Tim should not be a leading candidate--his impact on understanding how students learn physics and how we should teach it has been immense at Illinois and beyond. His creativity, intuition, leadership, and staggering amounts of hard work have resulted in greatly improved student outcomes and instructor satisfaction in the calculus-based introductory physics courses that are taken by every engineering student and many others across campus. I can think of no one more worthy than Tim of receiving the Scott Rose Award."

He is a co-developer of smartPhysics, along with PER colleagues Mats Selen and Gary Gladding. smartPhysics is a web-based learning environment for the first year of introductory calculus-based physics (Physics 211 and Physics 212) that includes animated pre-lectures; lectures with content guided by student assessments, peer instruction, and active learning segments; and an online homework system with interactive tutorials and immediate assessments.

This same PER team also developed a wireless student response system, the i>clicker, now in use by over two million students at more than nine hundred institutions.

More recently, the team has developed IOLab, an inexpensive hand-held wireless device that provides a hands-on laboratory experience. It integrates a large collection of sensors (accelerometer, magnetometer, gyroscope, barometer, thermometer, force probe, light intensity, speaker, microphone, EKG, and more) with an online content delivery system, to enable students to explore many key introductory physics concepts on their own.

Stelzer’s efforts to enrich undergraduate physics education with effective methodologies and tools have been widely recognized. In 2014, Stelzer was elected to the chair line of the American Physical Society (APS) Forum on Education (FEd). He is currently serving as chair-elect in this his second of three term years. He will become chair of the forum in April 2016. Stelzer, along with colleagues Selen and Gladding, was selected for the 2013 Excellence in Education Award by the APS. In 2011, Stelzer received the Arnold Nordsieck Award for Excellence in Teaching from Physics Illinois. In 2009, he was named a Distinguished Teacher-Scholar by the University of Illinois. And in 2005, he received the BP Amoco Award for Innovation in Undergraduate Education. Stelzer is regularly included on the University's "Incomplete List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students."

Stelzer received his bachelor's degree in physics from St. John's University in 1988 and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1993. He completed postdoctoral appointments at the Center for Particle Theory at Durham University (UK) and then at the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois. He joined the faculty at Physics Illinois in 1998 as a visiting assistant research professor. He was appointed an assistant research professor in 2000 and associate professor of physics in 2012.

 

Recent News

  • In the Media

There have been accusations for years that the Major League ball is “juiced,” thus accounting for the increasing power numbers.

MLB officials have categorically denied that, and last year, commissioned a study of the baseball and how it’s produced.

In the landmark 85-page independent report replete with color graphs, algorithms and hypotheses, a group of 10 highly-rated professors and scientists chaired by Alan Nathan determined that the ball is not livelier or “juiced.” Nathan is a professor emeritus of physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.

The surge in home runs “seems, instead, to have arisen from a decrease in the ball’s drag properties, which cause it to carry further than previously, given the same set of initial conditions – exit velocity, launch and spray angle, and spin. So, there is indirect evidence that the ball has changed, but we don’t yet know how,” wrote Leonard Mlodinow, in the report’s eight-page executive summary.

  • In the Media

Growing up in Trinidad and Tobago, Kandice Tanner went to a school where she was one of only a dozen girls among 1200 pupils. She had switched from an all-girl school to avoid the distractions of socializing and to take the more advanced math classes offered at the boys’ school. “Being submerged in an all-male environment early on was beneficial to me,” Tanner says. “I felt comfortable with guys, and more important, I knew I could hold my own in a male-dominated environment.”

  • Research
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Illinois Physics Professor Philip Phillips and Math Professor Gabriele La Nave have theorized a new kind of electromagnetism far beyond anything conceivable in classical electromagnetism today, a conjecture that would upend our current understanding of the physical world, from the propagation of light to the quantization of charge. Their revolutionary new theory, which Phillips has dubbed “fractional electromagnetism,” would also solve an intriguing problem that has baffled physicists for decades, elucidating emergent behavior in the “strange metal” of the cuprate superconductors.

This research is published in an upcoming colloquium paper in Reviews of Modern Physics (arXiv:1904.01023v1).

  • Accolades
  • Student News

The BPS Art of Science Image Contest took place again this year, during the 63rd Annual Meeting in Baltimore. The image that won first place was submitted by Angela Barragan, PhD Candidate at the Beckman Institute UIUC. Barragan took some time to provide information about the image and the science it represents.